Substation Connectors

When substation switchgear and other high voltage equipment are being designed, engineers must take into account how these pieces of equipment will be able to interconnect with one another. High voltage switchgear and transformers must have an electrical terminal system in order to connect with one another using busbars.

We can offer a complete head to the connector solutions such as Sineflex and Simabus for substation applications from the busbar structure to the high voltage equipment terminal system. These connectors can match with any busbar height and interconnect specification.

Substation Connectors

Substation connectors come in many sizes and types depending on the application. They can be bolted directly onto a busbar or inserted into a connector housing. There are two main types of substation connectors: bolt connectors and clamp connectors. Connectors are components that are used to join two or more parts together. At a substation, you’ll find connectors used to connect busbars together, to connect blocks and circuit breakers to the busbars, and to connect the busbars to high voltage equipment such as transformers, switchgear, and capacitor banks. A busbar is a large, flat metal bar that acts as a common electrical pathway for current to flow through a substation. It consists of an insulated conductor, a ground conductor, and a metal covering. Busbars are connected by connectors that are installed during the fabrication of a substation.

What is the function of a busbar in a substation?

A busbar (also known as a feeder bar or feeder cable) is the main electrical path that supplies power to loads such as transformers, circuit breakers, and switchgear. The busbar is located on the high voltage side of the substation, which is typically on the left side of the substation as you’re facing the equipment. It’s connected to the low voltage (LV) side of the substation, where the loads are located, via a transformer. The transformer steps down the voltage from the high side to the low side so that equipment on the LV side of the substation can be energized.

Bolt type connectors

Bolt connectors are used to connect two pieces of equipment together by bolting them to a busbar. They are available in a wide range of configurations, sizes, and styles to suit a wide range of applications. You’ll find bolt connectors that have a cylindrical bolt, a hexagonal bolt, or a flat washer-type bolt. While the difference between these connections is small, they can have a large impact on the design. The cylindrical bolt is the most common type of bolt connector used in switchgear. It’s designed to fit within a cylindrical socket on the busbar in order to make a solid connection. The hexagonal bolt is designed to fit into a hexagonal socket on the busbar. The washer-type bolt is meant to fit into a hexagonal socket but uses a washer in order to create a stronger connection.

Clamp type connectors

Clamp connectors are used to connect two pieces of equipment together by sandwiching them between two halves of the connector and then tightening the two halves together. They are available in a wide range of configurations, sizes, and styles to suit a wide range of applications.

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